Weekly Health Update from your Napa Chiropractor

Mental Attitude: Poor Social Relationships May Increase Dementia Risk. A lack of social interaction during adulthood may
be associated with a greater risk for a dementia diagnosis later in life. A meta-analysis of data from 19 long-term studies notes
that low social participation, less frequent social interaction, and a sense of loneliness are all linked to between a 1.41 and 1.58
greater risk for dementia. The authors of the study add that these risks are similar to other established risk factors for dementia
such as low education attainment, physical inactivity, and late-life depression. Ageing Research Reviews, May 2015
Health Alert: Some Plastic Teething Toys May Be Unsafe. Laboratory tests conducted on a small sample of ten plastic infant
teethers found that two of the toys contained endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC). Previous research has shown that EDCs
can affect fertility, increase the risk of endometriosis among females, impair organ and neural development, and even cause
some cancers. The researchers note that such chemicals offer little benefit to the quality of the product and should be
discontinued from use given the potential danger to the children who put them in their mouths.
Journal of Applied Toxicology, May 2015
Diet: When You Eat May Impact Your Health. A new report suggests that watching when you eat, without necessarily
changing what or how much, may result in significant health benefits. The findings suggest that eating within an 8-to-12 hour
period each day changes metabolism at the genetic level, resulting in lower blood sugar levels. The researchers call the
phenomenon time-restricted eating, and they believe it could be powerful enough to lower the risk for some cancers, heart
disease, dementia, and diabetes. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, April 2015
Exercise: Strengthening Hips Could Ease Calf Pain Caused By Peripheral Artery Disease. People who suffer from
peripheral artery disease (PAD) may be able to ease their calf pain if they exercise to strengthen their hips. PAD causes arteries
in the legs and other parts of the body to narrow, which restricts blood flow. This often leads to changes in skin color,
development of sores, pain, and difficulty walking. Researchers found the people with PAD used their calf muscle more when
walking because their hip muscles were weak; therefore, they conclude that strengthening the hip muscles could lead to less
stress on the calf muscles. American Heart Association, May 2015
Chiropractic: Improved Posture Helps Patients Avoid Back Pain Recurrence. Patients with chronic low back pain who
received therapies designed to improve their posture were more likely to report clinically significant improvements in both pain
and function one year after the conclusion of treatment than patients whose posture was not addressed during the course of their
care. Scientific World Journal, April 2015
Wellness/Prevention: Vitamin D May Help Obese Patients Lose Weight. Italian researchers studied 400 overweight and
obese individuals with vitamin D deficiency and found that a low-calorie diet combined with vitamin D supplementation led to
greater reductions in waistlines than a low-calorie diet alone. Lead researcher Dr. Luisella Vigna adds, “The present data
indicate that in obese and overweight people with vitamin D deficiency, vitamin D supplementation aids weight loss and
enhances the beneficial effects of a reduced-calorie diet.” The researchers suggest that overweight and obese individuals should
have their vitamin D levels tested. European Congress on Obesity, May 2015
Quote: “Beware the barrenness of a busy life.” ~ Socrates

I found that Dr. Joe Megna is one of the best chiropractors I have found in the Napa region.

Weekly Health Update from your Napa Chiropractor

Mental Attitude: Exercising Your Memory. To help individuals keep their minds sharp at any age, experts from the Harvard Medical School recommend learning a new skill or language, taking up a new hobby, reading books, and solving puzzles. Harvard Medical School, May 2015
Health Alert: Don’t Wear Heels at Home! According to researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, half of high heel-related injuries occur at home. This suggests that a simple strategy for women to reduce their risk of injury is to simply wear more appropriate footwear around the house. University of Alabama at Birmingham, May 2015
Diet: Can a South African Diet Reduce Colon Cancer Risk Among Americans? Based on the dramatic effects observed when American and South African volunteers swapped diets for just two weeks, researchers suggest that a diet high in fiber and low in fat could possibly reduce an individual’s risk for developing colon cancer. After fourteen days on the high-fiber, low-fat South African diet, the American group had significantly less inflammation in the colon along with a reduction in biomarkers associated with colon cancer risk. Meanwhile, tests on the African group showed the opposite, indicating a dramatic increase in cancer risk after just two weeks on the high-protein, low-fiber American diet. According to the study’s authors, one could achieve similar results by increasing their fiber intake to 50 grams per day.
Nature Communications, April 2015
Exercise: Cardio May Help Slow Down Aging in the Brain. The findings of a new study suggest that cardiorespiratory exercise could be prescribed to lessen age-related declines in brain structure. Researchers found that cardiorespiratory fitness was positively linked to the structural integrity of white matter in the brains of the older adults. They write, “We hope this study provides additional motivation for older adults to increase their levels of physical activity, which positively impacts health, mood, cognition and the brain.” Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, April 2015
Chiropractic: How Physical Inactivity Affects the Spine. MRI scans conducted on 72 older adults found that physical inactivity can be detrimental to the spine. Researchers observed the intervertebral disks of those with low physical activity levels appeared to be shorter than the disks of those who were more physically active. Previous research suggests a reduction in disk height is associated with a greater risk for back pain. The researchers also found the lumbar stabilizing muscles of inactive participants were more likely to have fatty deposits, suggesting compromised function.
Arthritis Research & Therapy, May 2015
Wellness/Prevention: How to Choose a Bicycle Helmet. Wearing a helmet when cycling is vital for both young and old riders to prevent head injuries, but it is important that a helmet fits properly. The Cleveland Clinic suggests the following: the helmet’s padding should fit snuggly, it should sit level and not move in any direction, look for the Consumer Product Safety Commission sticker when buying a helmet, and a pre-owned helmet should only be worn if it has no cracks or breaks and was made after 1999. The Cleveland Clinic, May 2015
Quote: “I believe that we form our own lives, that we create our own reality, and that everything works out for the best.”
~ Jim Henson

I found that Dr. Joe Megna is one of the best chiropractors I have found in the Napa region.

Weekly Health Update from your Napa Chiropractor

Mental Attitude: Exercising Your Memory. To help individuals keep their minds sharp at any age, experts from the Harvard Medical School recommend learning a new skill or language, taking up a new hobby, reading books, and solving puzzles. Harvard Medical School, May 2015
Health Alert: Don’t Wear Heels at Home! According to researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, half of high heel-related injuries occur at home. This suggests that a simple strategy for women to reduce their risk of injury is to simply wear more appropriate footwear around the house. University of Alabama at Birmingham, May 2015
Diet: Can a South African Diet Reduce Colon Cancer Risk Among Americans? Based on the dramatic effects observed when American and South African volunteers swapped diets for just two weeks, researchers suggest that a diet high in fiber and low in fat could possibly reduce an individual’s risk for developing colon cancer. After fourteen days on the high-fiber, low-fat South African diet, the American group had significantly less inflammation in the colon along with a reduction in biomarkers associated with colon cancer risk. Meanwhile, tests on the African group showed the opposite, indicating a dramatic increase in cancer risk after just two weeks on the high-protein, low-fiber American diet. According to the study’s authors, one could achieve similar results by increasing their fiber intake to 50 grams per day.
Nature Communications, April 2015
Exercise: Cardio May Help Slow Down Aging in the Brain. The findings of a new study suggest that cardiorespiratory exercise could be prescribed to lessen age-related declines in brain structure. Researchers found that cardiorespiratory fitness was positively linked to the structural integrity of white matter in the brains of the older adults. They write, “We hope this study provides additional motivation for older adults to increase their levels of physical activity, which positively impacts health, mood, cognition and the brain.” Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, April 2015
Chiropractic: How Physical Inactivity Affects the Spine. MRI scans conducted on 72 older adults found that physical inactivity can be detrimental to the spine. Researchers observed the intervertebral disks of those with low physical activity levels appeared to be shorter than the disks of those who were more physically active. Previous research suggests a reduction in disk height is associated with a greater risk for back pain. The researchers also found the lumbar stabilizing muscles of inactive participants were more likely to have fatty deposits, suggesting compromised function.
Arthritis Research & Therapy, May 2015
Wellness/Prevention: How to Choose a Bicycle Helmet. Wearing a helmet when cycling is vital for both young and old riders to prevent head injuries, but it is important that a helmet fits properly. The Cleveland Clinic suggests the following: the helmet’s padding should fit snuggly, it should sit level and not move in any direction, look for the Consumer Product Safety Commission sticker when buying a helmet, and a pre-owned helmet should only be worn if it has no cracks or breaks and was made after 1999. The Cleveland Clinic, May 2015
Quote: “I believe that we form our own lives, that we create our own reality, and that everything works out for the best.”
~ Jim Henson

I found that Dr. Joe Megna is one of the best chiropractors I have found in the Napa region.

Weekly Health Update from your Napa Chiropractor

Mental Attitude: More Sleep May Help Alzheimer’s Patients. Extra sleep may help improve the memories of patients with Alzheimer’s disease. In a study involving fruit flies, researchers found that extra sleep — the equivalent of three-to-four hours of sleep for humans — restored the ability of flies with Alzheimer’s-like symptoms to make new memories. Though more studies are needed, this finding could one day offer a new path of treatment for patients with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. Current Biology, April 2015
Health Alert: One in Four Breast Cancer Cases May Be Preventable. Experts from the American Society of Clinical Oncology advise that a healthy lifestyle can reduce a woman’s risk for breast cancer nearly 25%, even if she has a family history of the disease. Previous research has associated the following lifestyle factors with a lower risk of breast cancer diagnosis: maintaining a healthy weight, performing at least 150 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per week, limiting alcohol consumption, not smoking, and eating a healthy diet. American Society of Clinical Oncology, May 2015
Diet: Could a Smiley Face Make Healthy Foods More Appealing to Kids? While schools in the United States are providing healthier food options in their cafeterias as part of a federal initiative, getting kids to put more nutritious items on their plate can be a challenge. Researchers have found that adding a smiley face label to healthy foods such as fruits and vegetables or adding a small prize to a plate of four healthy foods resulted in a 62% rise in vegetable servings and a 20% increase in fruit servings on student trays. Pediatric Academic Societies, April 2015
Exercise: Reduces Vertigo Risk in Women. After examining the lifestyles of nearly 500 older women, researchers conclude that performing regular physical activity can reduce a woman’s risk for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) by over 160%! International Archives of Otorhinolaryngology, October 2014
Chiropractic: Back Pain and Sleep Difficulties. After following both chronic and new-onset back pain patients for six months, researchers report that two out of three patients with low back pain experience difficulty sleeping, typically during the week following an episode of back pain. Therefore, to ensure back pain patients have the best opportunity to achieve restful sleep, it’s important for them to follow their doctor’s advice in regards to maintaining a healthy spine and making recommended lifestyle changes to reduce their risk of re-injury. Clinical Journal of Pain, May 2015
Wellness/Prevention: Smartphone App Could Prevent Teens from Using Phone While Driving. A preliminary study suggests that a smartphone app that turns off a teenager’s cell phone service when they turn on their car could help prevent accidents. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, car accidents are the leading cause of accidental death among teens, with cell phone use behind the wheel increasing teen accident risk by nearly 24 times! Researchers found that teens who drove cars outfitted with phone-blocking technology drove up to 80% safer than teens in a control group. The communications director of the Governors Highway Safety Association adds, “The more we can get parents to implement these new technological tools and really engage in the process with their novice drivers, the greater chance we have of preventing teen driver crashes and the resulting injuries and fatalities.” Pediatric Academic Societies, April 2015
Quote: “Parents can only give good advice or put them on the right paths, but the final forming of a person’s character lies in their own hands.” ~ Anne Frank
I found that Dr. Joe Megna is one of the best chiropractors I have found in the Napa region.

Weekly Health Update from your Napa Chiropractor

Mental Attitude: Leafy Greens May Protect Aging Brains. An evaluation of the eating habits and mental abilities of over 950 older adults revealed that eating a single serving of leafy green vegetables per day may reduce an individual’s risk for dementia. The study found that those who consumed one or two servings of spinach, kale, mustard greens, collards, or similar vegetables on a daily basis experienced slower mental deterioration than those who ate no leafy greens at all. Dr. Yvette Sheline, a professor of psychiatry and neurology at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine writes, “It makes sense that leafy green vegetables would have an effect on mental health… We know generally that what you eat, or don’t eat, can affect your risk for high blood pressure and vascular disease, which can both then worsen the course of dementia.” American Society for Nutrition Annual Meeting, March 2015
Health Alert: Depression and Diabetes Both Increase Dementia Risk! Previous research has shown that both type 2 diabetes and depression can independently increase an individual’s risk for dementia, but what happens when they co-occur? Danish researchers analyzed data collected from 2.4 million adults and found that while depression increases a person’s risk for dementia by 83% and the presence of type 2 diabetes results in a 20% greater risk, those with both type 2 diabetes and depression are 117% more likely to be diagnosed with dementia. This suggests that the presence of both conditions has a synergistic effect on dementia risk, not just an additive effect. JAMA Psychiatry, April 2015
Diet: New Broccoli Reduces Cholesterol. Eating ten or more weekly servings of a new variety of broccoli has been demonstrated to reduce Low-density lipoprotein (bad cholesterol) levels by about 6%. This new broccoli variety known as Beneforte was bred to contain two to three times more glucoraphanin, a compound that is converted to sulphoraphane inside the body. Previous research has observed that sulphoraphane activates genes that keep the body from converting excess dietary fat and sugar into bad cholesterol.
Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, April 2015
Exercise: Exercise Helps Fibromyalgia Patients. An 18-week functional training program for women with fibromyalgia (FM) resulted in reductions in both pain and tender points along with a positive impact on their overall quality of life. If further studies verify these findings, such training (which consisted of two sessions of in-water exercise and one session of on-land exercise each week) could play an important role in helping FM patients maintain an independent lifestyle. Modern Rheumatology, April 2015
Chiropractic: Could Migraines and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Be Linked? Researchers from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center suggest that carpal tunnel syndrome can increase an individual’s risk for migraine headaches, and migraines may increase the likelihood of one developing carpal tunnel syndrome. Researchers analyzed data from nearly 26,000 Americans and found that the risk of migraine was 2.6 times higher in people with carpal tunnel syndrome. Similarly, the risk of carpal tunnel syndrome was 2.7 times higher among migraine sufferers. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, March 2015
Wellness/Prevention: What Part of the Day Do Teens Become Less Active? While adolescents have been observed to be less physically active and spend more time performing sedentary activities as they grow older, no previous studies have analyzed how these changes occur during the course of a teen’s average week. In this study, 363 teens wore accelerometers at both age 12 and age 15, and researchers recorded how much time was spent each day being inactive or performing either light physical activity or moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. They found that by age 15, participants were sedentary 7-8% more often during school hours and both after school and on weekends. Across the board, students spent about 7% less time performing light physical activities while moderate-to-vigorous activity levels remained largely unchanged. Due to the increase in sedentary time across all aspects of an adolescent’s week, the investigators recommend that future interventions intended to help teens become more active need to focus on both their in-school and after-school/weekend activities. Int’l Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, April 2015
Quote: “Go on with what your heart tells you, or you will lose all.” ~ Rick Riordan

I found that Dr. Joe Megna is one of the best chiropractors I have found in the Napa region.

Weekly Health Update from your Napa Chiropractor

Mental Attitude: Dementia Increases Odds of Complications During a Hospital Stay. During a hospital admission, older patients with dementia have a 2.5 times greater risk for experiencing preventable complications such as urinary tract infections, pressure areas, pneumonia, and delirium. According to experts, these complications can result in an eight-fold increase in the amount of time the dementia patient remains under inpatient care. BMC Health Services Research, March 2015
Health Alert: Short People at Greater Risk of Coronary Heart Disease. Researchers at the University of Leicester claim that shorter men and women have proportionally smaller coronary arteries that place them at a greater risk for heart disease than taller people. The investigators found that every 2.5 inch (~6.35 cm) change in height affects coronary heart disease risk by 13.5%. Study leader Dr. Nilesh Samani explains, “While our findings do not have any immediate clinical implications, better and fuller understanding of the biological mechanisms that underlie the relationship between shorter height and higher risk of coronary heart disease may open up new ways for its prevention and treatment.” New England Journal of Medicine, April 2015
Diet: Dietary Fiber Supplement May Help with Weight Control. An animal study found that rats fed a fiber supplement along with a high-fat and high-sugar diet gained less weight than subjects fed the same diet without the supplement. Despite having constant access to food high in both fat and sugar, researchers found that rats given supplemental oligofructose fiber gained about 30% less weight than the control group. Senior author Dr. Keith Sharkey notes, “Our data shows that a simple dietary intervention with a prebiotic oligofructose fiber reduced weight gain and this may also lead to the long-term maintenance of a lower body weight in the face of continued dietary challenge.” Obesity, March 2015
Exercise: Exercise Is Good for Lung Cancer Patients. Physical activity should be considered as a treatment option for lung cancer patients as it reduces symptoms, increases exercise tolerance, improves quality of life, and potentially reduces the length of hospital stays and complications following lung cancer surgery. Lead researcher Dr. Gerard A. Silvestri advises that “clinicians should (at [a] minimum) consider physical activity early, counsel against inactivity, and encourage physical activity in all stages of lung cancer patients and lung cancer survivors. This review shows uniform recognition that exercise and physical activity are safe for those with lung cancer, patients are requesting increased activity counseling, and multiple studies and reviews show potential clinical benefit in quality of life, exercise tolerance, and post-operative complications. Further, we know that inactivity in cancer patients is associated with worse outcomes.” Journal of Thoracic Oncology, March 2015
Chiropractic: Vitamin D Can Improve Pain & Movement in Obese Osteoarthritis Patients. Chiropractors often recommend vitamin D because is a common deficiency and optimum levels are associated with several health benefits. In a new study, researchers analyzed blood samples, surveyed arthritic knee pain, and measured the functional performance of 256 middle age and older adults and found that higher levels of vitamin D may decrease pain and improve function in overweight and obese patients with osteoarthritis. Lead author Dr. Toni L. Glover concludes, “Vitamin D is inexpensive, available over-the-counter and toxicity is fairly rare. Older obese patients with chronic pain should discuss their vitamin D status with their primary care provider. If it’s low, take a supplement [and/or] get judicious sun exposure.” The Clinical Journal of Pain, January 2015
Wellness/Prevention: Cancer Deaths Decreasing in America. According to a new report, the United States is slowly and steadily winning the war against cancer as mortality rates from the disease continue to decline. Between 2002 and 2011, the overall cancer death rate fell an average of 1.5% per year, and the rate of new cancer rates declined an average of .5% per year. Co-author Dr. Ahmedin Jemal writes, “These numbers reflect a combination of factors that include prevention, early detection, and improved treatment.” Journal of the National Cancer Institute, March 2015
Quote: “…when it comes down to it, that’s what life is all about: showing up for the people you love, again and again, until you can’t show up anymore.” ~ Rebecca Walker

I found that Dr. Joe Megna is one of the best chiropractors I have found in the Napa region.

Weekly Health Update from your Napa Chiropractor

Mental Attitude: Stroke Prevention Efforts Paying Off. Fewer people are being treated in emergency rooms for strokes caused by blood clots in the brain, which experts believe is a sign that current prevention methods are working. Between 2001 and 2011, emergency room visits for stroke declined 35% for adults 18 and older and 51% for individuals 55 to 74 years of age. One expert explains that people are preventing strokes by taking steps to better control high blood pressure, not smoking (the greatest risk factor for stroke), and limiting exposure to secondhand smoke. National Center for Health Statistics Data Brief, March 2015
Health Alert: Increasing Alcohol Tax Could Save Lives. If taxes on the purchase of alcohol were increased, researchers claim that thousand of deaths from motor vehicle accidents could be prevented each year. A team of investigators found that alcohol-related automobile crashes declined 26% after the state of Illinois increased taxes on beer, wine, and spirits in 2009.
American Journal of Public Health, March 2015
Diet: Are American Kids Eating Less Fast Food? According to a new report, the percentage of children eating fast food on any given day fell from 38.8% in 2003-04 to 32.6% in 2009-10. The authors of the report also observed a decrease in the average number of calories children consumed at hamburger, chicken, and pizza fast food restaurants during this time frame. The findings are promising as childhood obesity has been a growing health concern over the last 30 years. JAMA Pediatrics, March 2015
Exercise: A 15-Minute Walk Reduces Cravings. Going for a 15-minute walk may suppress your desire for chocolate or snacks, according to the results of a new study. Researchers found that participants who exercised prior to physically handling sugary snacks demonstrated lower levels of cravings than those who were sedentary in the fifteen minutes before being handed a treat. The authors conclude, “Short bouts of physical activity may reduce the craving for sugary snacks in overweight people. When snacking has become habitual and poorly regulated by overweight people, the promotion of short bouts of physical activity could be valuable for reducing the urge to consume at times when the person may be particularly vulnerable, such as during stress and when snack foods are available.” PLOS ONE, March 2015
Chiropractic: Common Pain Relief Drug Not Effective for Back Pain or Arthritis. Acetaminophen appears to be ineffective in the treatment of low back pain and offers little benefit for sufferers of osteoarthritis of the hip or knee according to a new report published in the British Medical Journal. The findings are based on a systematic review and meta-analysis of 13 randomized controlled trials that were designed to investigate the safety and efficacy of acetaminophen in the management of spinal pain and osteoarthritis. The authors of the report urge patients to pursue physical treatments as the way forward and conclude that “[ongoing] and ever-increasing concerns about pharmacological management of musculoskeletal pain highlights the importance of non-pharmacological options, which form the cornerstone of self-management of spinal pain and osteoarthritis.”
British Medical Journal, March 2015
Wellness/Prevention: How Vitamin D May Protect the Heart… Though recent published studies have found strong associations between vitamin D deficiency and hypertension, metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, and atherosclerosis, the mechanisms by which vitamin D protects the cardiovascular system remain a mystery. In a new paper published in the Open Cardiovascular Medicine Journal, Dr. Natália Ribeiro Mandarino postulates that the presence of vitamin D improves the function of the hormone systems that regulate blood pressure, insulin sensitivity, and the body’s reaction to oxidative stress.
Open Cardiovascular Medicine Journal, March 2015
Quote: “If you love life, don’t waste time, for time is what life is made up of.” ~ Bruce Lee

I found that Dr. Joe Megna is one of the best chiropractors I have found in the Napa region.

Weekly Health Update from your Napa Chiropractor

Mental Attitude: Family Stress Linked to Obesity in Teens. An analysis of data from over 4,700 teens found that family stress during childhood can put teenagers at an increased risk for being overweight or obese. According to researchers, girls in the study who experienced family stress such as family disruption and financial problems during their early years were more likely to be obese and overweight during their teen years than their peers who were not subjected to such stressors. The researchers also found that boys whose mothers suffered from poor health were more likely to become obese or overweight by late adolescence. Study author Dr. Daphne Hernandez concludes, “This study extends our knowledge of stress and obesity by focusing on the family environment over time. By knowing the types of stressors that influence female and male adolescent weight gain, we can tailor specific social services to be included in obesity prevention programs.” Preventive Medicine, April 2015
Health Alert: Another Reason Not to Get A Sunburn While on Vacation! According to a report from the United Kingdom, today’s seniors are about seven times more likely to develop a potentially deadly form of skin cancer called malignant melanoma than their predecessors from just 40 years ago. Experts speculate that this massive rise in the number of seniors developing this particular form of cancer is most likely a result of sunburns sustained while on vacation during their younger years in pursuit of a good tan.
Cancer Research UK, April 2015
Diet: Another Reason to Eat Lots of Fruits and Vegetables… Chinese researchers analyzed data from fourteen published studies regarding inflammatory bowel disease and found that participants who consumed the most servings of fruits and vegetables per day were 30-40% less likely to be diagnosed with either Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis when compared with those who consumed the fewest daily servings of produce. European Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, March 2015
Exercise: Exercise at Any Level Benefits Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease. If you are overweight or obese with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, a new study suggests that exercise can have significant benefits regardless of amount or intensity. During an eight-week study, researchers found that participants in three different exercise groups with varying levels of intensity all experienced a sizeable reduction in liver fat. Those who participated in a high-intensity, low-volume aerobic exercise or a low-to-moderate intensity, high-volume aerobic exercise experienced the greatest liver and visceral fat reduction. Study leader Dr. Nathan Johnson adds, “The results from our study show that all exercise doses, irrespective of volume or intensity, were efficacious in reducing liver fat and visceral fat by an amount that was clinically significant, in previously inactive overweight or obese adults compared with placebo.” Journal of Hepatology, April 2015
Chiropractic: What Causes Osteoarthritis? In the past, osteoarthritis (OA) was believed to be a wear and tear disease that affects the articular cartilage covering the ends of bones where they meet to form joints. New research shows OA to be a rather complex degenerative disease that may be caused by low-grade inflammation in the cartilage and the surrounding soft tissues that results in deterioration of the cartilage and a compromised joint structure. Although some risk factors for OA cannot be avoided (such as genetics, sex, and age), others are wholly in control of the patient. Controllable factors include: improperly treated sports injuries, lack of physical exercise, and overweight or obese body weight status. International Journal of Molecular Science, March 2015
Wellness/Prevention: Images on Cigarette Packs Educate Young Adults About Smoking Dangers. The results of two new studies indicate that young adults gain a much greater appreciation for the health consequences related to smoking when warning texts about the dangers of cigarette use are accompanied by graphic illustrations. Study author Dr. Renee E. Magnan explains, “Although this is a preliminary investigation, from a policy perspective, these outcomes suggest that focusing on deriving greater understanding and knowledge from such labels may have more impact in terms of both motivational and emotional responses. Importantly, however, these labels are only a small piece of what should be a larger campaign to educate the public on the dangers of smoking.”
Annals of Behavioral Medicine, April 2015
Quote: “Once you have read a book you care about, some part of it is always with you.” ~ Louis L’Amour

I found that Dr. Joe Megna is one of the best chiropractors I have found in the Napa region.

Weekly Health Update from your Napa Chiropractor

Mental Attitude: Anger and Anxiety Increase Heart Attack Risk. An analysis of more than 300 heart attack patients indicates that intense anger or anxiety dramatically increases an individual’s risk for a myocardial infarction in the hours immediately following such an occurrence. More specifically, in the 120 minutes following a bout of intense anger, a person’s risk for a heart attack increases by 8.5 times and an extreme anxiety episode elevates the risk by 9.5 times! Senior researcher Dr. Thomas Buckley writes, “While the absolute risk of any one anger episode triggering a heart attack is low, our data demonstrates that the danger is real and still there.” He further comments that the increased risk of heart attack after intense anger or anxiety is “most likely the result of increased heart rate and blood pressure, tightening of blood vessels, and increased clotting, all associated with triggering of heart attacks.”
European Heart Journal: Acute Cardiovascular Care, February 2015
Health Alert: Bleeding Risk for Recent Heart Attack Patients Who Take NSAIDs. A new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) suggests that taking ibuprofen and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) elevates the risk of bleeding in heart attack survivors on anti-clotting medications. The authors note that these risks are of considerable public health concern due to the widespread use of NSAIDs and conclude that “[more] research is needed to confirm these findings; however, physicians should exercise appropriate caution when prescribing NSAIDs for patients who have recently experienced [a myocardial infarction].” JAMA, February 2015
Diet: Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Reduce Damage After Heart Attack. High doses of omega-3 fatty acids may protect the heart against further damage following a myocardial infraction. In a recent study that included 374 heart attack survivors, those who took a daily 4g dose of omega-3 fatty acids in addition to standard treatment had lower resulting levels of inflammation and were 39% less likely to show deterioration of heart function than those who received standard care with a placebo. Senior study author Dr. Raymond Kwong writes, “This is important because other anti-inflammatory agents, including steroids and NSAIDs, have failed to make a difference after [heart attack].” American College of Cardiology, March 2015
Exercise: Working Out Before Bed Doesn’t Hinder Sleep. While some fear that working out late in the evening can interfere with sleep, a study comparing the effects of working out at 5 PM and 9 PM showed no reductions in sleep quality when compared with measurements taken on nights when participants did not exercise at all.
The Journal of Sports Medicine & Physical Fitness, March 2015
Chiropractic: Resolution of Facial Neuralgia Following Chiropractic Care. After failing to respond to medical care for diagnosed trigeminal neuralgia, the mother of a 10-year-old boy brought her child to a chiropractor as a treatment of last resort. The boy’s presenting symptoms included headaches, earaches, neck pain, and extreme facial pain. After seven months of chiropractic care that focused on the upper cervical spine, the patient reported complete resolution of his main complaint. The findings suggests that chiropractic treatment to the cervical spine may benefit patients with facial neuralgias.
Journal of Upper Cervical Chiropractic Research, February 2015
Wellness/Prevention: Most Smokers Will Die Early if They Don’t Quit. If you want to live longer, you should quit smoking now. A new study that followed over 200,000 men and women found that two-thirds of smokers died an average of ten years sooner than their peers who were non-smokers. Study director Dr. Emily Banks comments, “We knew smoking was bad, but we now have direct independent evidence that confirms the disturbing findings that have been emerging internationally.” BMC Medicine, February 2015
Quote: “Concentrate on what will produce results rather than on the results, the process rather than the prize.” ~ Bill Walsh

I found that Dr. Joe Megna is one of the best chiropractors I have found in the Napa region.